Wellness Hotel – Hotel Rondinella http://hotelrondinella.com/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 22:28:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hotelrondinella.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/hotelrondinella-icon.png Wellness Hotel – Hotel Rondinella http://hotelrondinella.com/ 32 32 Missouri doctor faces $500 billion in FTC fines for promoting vitamin D3 during pandemic https://hotelrondinella.com/missouri-doctor-faces-500-billion-in-ftc-fines-for-promoting-vitamin-d3-during-pandemic/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 22:20:23 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/missouri-doctor-faces-500-billion-in-ftc-fines-for-promoting-vitamin-d3-during-pandemic/ A St. Louis chiropractor could face more than $500 billion in civil penalties in a federal lawsuit alleging he profited from the sale of infringing vitamin D and zinc products of the COVID-19 Consumer Protection Act. “The feds are suing me for half a trillion dollars…for telling people to take vitamins,” said Dr. Eric Nepute. […]]]>

A St. Louis chiropractor could face more than $500 billion in civil penalties in a federal lawsuit alleging he profited from the sale of infringing vitamin D and zinc products of the COVID-19 Consumer Protection Act.

“The feds are suing me for half a trillion dollars…for telling people to take vitamins,” said Dr. Eric Nepute.

Nepute said his case will go to trial in federal court in Missouri in March.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed the 27-page complaint in April 2021. It alleges, among other things, that Nepute profited from the online sale of vitamin D and zinc products during the public health emergency. COVID-19.

dr. Antoine Fauci responds to accusations by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) as he testifies before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, on Capitol Hill in Washington on July 20, 2021. (J. Scott Applewhite/Getty Images)

Nepute, 41, is a licensed chiropractor and owner of the Nepute Wellness Center in St. Louis. He is also the owner of Quickwork, a limited liability company doing business as Wellness Warrior.

The government complaint alleges that Nepute, through social media and internet advertising, promoted and sold “Wellness Warrior Vita D” and other products as drugs capable of treating or preventing COVID-19.

“From June 2020 at the latest, [Nepute] began announcing a protocol for customers to follow to protect against, prevent or treat COVID-19. This protocol, which has varied over time, advises consumers to take [daily] substantial amounts of emulsified vitamin D3 and zinc,” found in Wellness Warrior products, the complaint states.

The complaint also claimed that “no published study proves that vitamin D protects, treats or prevents COVID-19”.

According to the lawsuit, Nepute’s “lack of factual or scientific basis for these claims [are] frequently accompanied by equally unsubstantiated claims about applicable science.

“In short, the defendants sell their products by disseminating information, by exploiting fears [amid] a pandemic and presenting a significant risk to public health and safety.

However, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that vitamin D is “essential for bone health as well as muscle and nerve function.” [and] helps the immune system fight bacteria and viruses.

Epoch Times Photo
Missouri chiropractor Dr. Eric Napute faces civil penalties totaling more than $500 billion in a government case that claims he fraudulently profited from the sale and promotion of vitamin D3 and zinc during the coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19. (Courtesy of Dr. Eric Napute)

Despite numerous settlement and arbitration offers, Nepute has rejected any out-of-court resolution and is confident that his case is strong enough to stand trial.

“The only reason they’re going after me — and they said so — is because I’m the first doctor they sued, and they want to set a precedent,” Nepute said.

“They said they wouldn’t stop until they had ‘blood on their sword’. It’s literally from the mouth of the FTC.

Nepute said his vocal stance in support of vitamin D and zinc as immune boosters — including his free public distribution of 2 million tablets during the pandemic — has caught the attention of the federal government.

At the time, the government focused on the emergency authorized use of COVID-19 vaccines as the only safe and effective treatment for the disease.

“The [FTC is] pushing this because it’s political,” Nepute told The Epoch Times. “I spent $3.5 million defending myself. The only tactic they have is to drag this out, so I can’t afford to sue him.

Nepute’s attorneys recently filed a motion to dismiss the government’s case on summary judgment, including over 10 million alleged violations of the COVID-19 Consumer Protection Act of 2020 and 12 million violations of the law. FTC.

Each alleged violation is punishable by a maximum civil fine of $43,792 for a total of more than $500 billion – “exceeding the gross domestic product of Austria, Nigeria and all but 25 countries”, according to the motion.

Frontline attorney Tom Renz of Ohio is Nepute’s counsel in this case.

“The problem with this is a wrongful prosecution, in my view,” Renz said, “because [Nepute] didn’t lie. He did not commit fraud. He said it would boost your immune system, and it’s true. Both [vitamin D and zinc] are well-known mechanisms for boosting your immune system.

“It just haunts him because he was outspoken about using vitamin D and zinc, and he didn’t like the jab – that’s all it is. He had a big following and they wanted make him an example,” Renz told The Epoch Times.

“There is no legal basis for them to move on this – none.”

Renz pointed to statements by Dr. Anthony Fauci, who said during an Instagram live stream that vitamin D “impacts your susceptibility to infections.”

“So I wouldn’t mind recommending, and I do it myself while taking vitamin D supplements.”

In September 2020, researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine published a report that found a link between vitamin D deficiency and COVID-19 infection.

“Vitamin D is important for the functioning of the immune system and vitamin D supplements have already been shown to reduce the risk of viral respiratory tract infections,” said study lead author David Meltzer. Chief of Hospital Medicine at UChicago Medicine.

“Our statistical analysis suggests this may be true for COVID-19 infection.”

Renz said: “Anthony Fauci said you should use vitamin D. Why don’t they sue Fauci?”

“I want to know when the FTC is going after vaccine companies and officials who promote the lie ‘that COVID-19 vaccines stop transmission.

“I want to know why it’s OK for Anthony Fauci to say the vaccine stops transmission even though he knew it was wrong at the time, and we can show he knew it was wrong.”

“I spent all of my life savings” defending myself against the FTC lawsuit, Nepute said. “I just sold a property. I sold a car. I sold everything to defend myself. I could have settled down and left, but that’s not the right thing to do.

“What I’m talking about isn’t rocket science. What I did was repeat the medical literature and provide solutions for people who thought they didn’t have a solution to anything.

In September 2009, pharmaceutical manufacturer Pfizer agreed to pay $2.3 billion for making false claims to promote four drugs – the largest health care fraud settlement in the history of the US Department of Health. Justice. The pharmaceutical company also manufactures one of three COVID-19 vaccines.

Allan Stein

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Allan Stein is an Epoch Times reporter who covers the state of Arizona.

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Ochsner gears up for Clearview opening in 2023 with upcoming job fair and final details on Metairie facility | Sponsored: Ochsner https://hotelrondinella.com/ochsner-gears-up-for-clearview-opening-in-2023-with-upcoming-job-fair-and-final-details-on-metairie-facility-sponsored-ochsner/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 06:15:00 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/ochsner-gears-up-for-clearview-opening-in-2023-with-upcoming-job-fair-and-final-details-on-metairie-facility-sponsored-ochsner/ Editor’s note This article is brought to you by Ochsner. Ochsner is making healthcare easier for residents of the Jefferson Parish area with the upcoming opening of the Ochsner Medical Complex – Clearview, scheduled for February 2023. The downtown Clearview facility is described as a patient-centric healthcare destination with a wide range of medical services, […]]]>

Ochsner is making healthcare easier for residents of the Jefferson Parish area with the upcoming opening of the Ochsner Medical Complex – Clearview, scheduled for February 2023.

The downtown Clearview facility is described as a patient-centric healthcare destination with a wide range of medical services, including minimally invasive and robotic surgery, OB/GYN care, breast care for women, pain management, ambulatory endoscopies and other health treatments, cardiac services, neurology services and more. It will also include a sinus center, a vision center and wellness services, such as a medical spa, acupuncture and other treatments.

“As we expand our presence in West Metairie, we wanted to ensure that we provide everything we can for our patients, including primary care and life-saving screenings. It’s also an opportunity for us to move some of the less complicated procedures from the main campus to an accessible, high-tech environment,” said Dr. George Loss, Ochsner Regional Medical Director.

Rob Wolterman, Ochsner’s regional general manager for the South Shore region and clinical joint ventures, said hospital leaders have discussed improving access to healthcare in Metairie over the past four or last five years. When the former Sears Clearview City Center became available, Ochsner knew he had found the perfect location for a convenient, multi-specialty healthcare destination.

“It fits perfectly with our efforts to make health care more convenient for patients across the region,” Wolterman said. “A lot of what we do now is done in an outpatient-focused, outpatient environment to keep our patients healthy and out of hospital. When you combine this approach with the location and the needs of area residents, it really is ideal for our community. »

Andrew Hancher, AVP of Ambulatory Operations at Ochsner, said the overall goal of the Clearview complex is to provide patients with a complete healthcare experience in one place. Dr. Loss noted that one of Ochsner’s core tenets is a multidisciplinary approach to medical care, something patients will continue to see at Clearview. About 250 employees are expected to work at Clearview, most of them directly involved in patient services.

“We wanted to make sure there was a team available for patients as well as the technological advances they might be experiencing at our other facilities,” Dr. Loss said. “It’s really going to be a place where people can have certain procedures but also easy access to those wellness screenings to stay healthy.”

Now that the opening date is approaching, Ochsner begins the recruiting process for Clearview. A job fair will be held at the Clearview City Center on November 17. Interested persons are encouraged to RSVP today to secure their place at ochsner.org/career-events before the job fair. Some job offers will be made on site. Vacancies include RNs, RPNs, Surgical Technicians, Operating Room Assistants, Anesthesia Technicians, Ophthalmology Technicians, Surgery Planners, Imaging Technicians, CNAs, Physician Assistants, patient access representatives and more.

The new complex was designed around the patient experience, with an emphasis on ease and convenience. To ensure patients get to where they need to be as easily as possible, the Ochsner team emphasized accessibility and wayfinding throughout the construction process. Greeters will be posted at the entrances to help guide patients. Those with the MyOchsner app will be able to scan a barcode to notify medical staff of their arrival. A pharmacy with drive-thru will facilitate the pick-up of medications. Valet parking and patient transportation will make the overall experience more convenient for patients. And to accommodate busy schedules, the resort will be offering extended hours for select services.

State-of-the-art technology has also been integrated into all aspects of the Clearview complex. In addition to high-tech devices for robotic and minimally invasive surgery, there will be an O-Bar where patients can purchase wearable devices that measure key health parameters. O-Bar staff will also help patients enroll in MyOchsner and other digital medicine programs, as well as resolve any technology issues patients may encounter. Additionally, all medical offices will be equipped for virtual visits for patients who cannot come to Clearview in person.

During the design phase, Hancher said Ochsner executives looked at medical facilities in other states as well as best practices learned from its own large-scale projects such as the Benson Cancer Center in New York. Orleans and the Ochsner Medical Complex – The Grove in Baton Rouge.

“We took the best parts of some of our own recent designs and modeled this setup in a similar way,” Hancher said. “What really stands out about Clearview is the location and the space to accommodate so many offerings. We have created a healthcare destination that we can improve and adapt over time to continue to meet the needs of our community.

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Gamma Sigma Phi plans to ‘bring campus together’ with 68-hour volleyball event https://hotelrondinella.com/gamma-sigma-phi-plans-to-bring-campus-together-with-68-hour-volleyball-event/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 21:27:39 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/gamma-sigma-phi-plans-to-bring-campus-together-with-68-hour-volleyball-event/ The men of Gamma Sigma Phi will play volleyball for 68 consecutive hours, and all for a good cause. The event will take place Nov. 10-13 at the Royce and Pam Money Student Recreation and Wellness Center as well as the newly renovated Moody Coliseum, and donations will benefit Stick Horses and Capes, a local […]]]>

The men of Gamma Sigma Phi will play volleyball for 68 consecutive hours, and all for a good cause.

The event will take place Nov. 10-13 at the Royce and Pam Money Student Recreation and Wellness Center as well as the newly renovated Moody Coliseum, and donations will benefit Stick Horses and Capes, a local nonprofit that helps provide financial assistance to bereaved families who have lost a child.

The organization began when Marshall and Shelley Pinkston lost their child, Hollis Hayes Pinkston. After their painful loss, the Pinkstons created Stick Horses and Capes and held an annual clay shoot in honor of Hollis. The money raised by the organization is distributed to families across the country.

“I was completely blown away and so honored that GSP wanted to get more involved with our why,” said Shelley, president of Stick Horses and Capes. “That says a lot about GSP’s group of young men.”

Earlier this fall, GSP participated in the organization’s annual clay shoot to provide additional assistance in the smooth running of the event. After the event, GSP decided to donate all proceeds from this year’s annual 68-hour volleyball event to the organization. GSP then created sponsorship packages ranging from $250 to $1,000 to support the organization. Austin Petree, senior service activities coordinator for GSP, said the club was still accepting sponsorships.

“It’s a great organization that we wanted to help,” said Petree. “We just wanted to give back that way.”

The event is not just for GSP members, but invites the entire ACU community to come together and help support Stick Horses and Capes.

“This year we have a unique opportunity to benefit the community as a whole,” said Petree. “We benefit those in crisis across the country. Whether we raise $5,000 or $50,000, we are still going to make a difference.

The event will begin Nov. 10 at 4 p.m. and end Nov. 13 at 12 p.m. for a total of 68 hours of continuous volleyball. Some of the event features include a tournament in the newly renovated Moody, glow-in-the-dark volleyball, Sunday chapel service, free food and more. The 68-hour goal stems from the club’s founding in 1968. Kaden Yowell, president of GSP, said the club is built on service and generosity.

“Sixty-eight is not a value,” Yowell said. “It’s about the person next to you, it’s about your neighbor. These are all the other members of the community who give back. We can only do this through the Christian fellowship we have established, pushing each member to be better people, better men of God. You can’t do this without a supportive group as you walk with the Lord.

Tournament registration during the event began Monday at the Campus Center with a small entry fee for each team.

“It’s not just for GSP, it’s for everyone,” Yowell said. “We want everyone there, whether it’s 1:00 a.m., early afternoon, or whatever.”

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The “magic” of Marygrove’s Early Ed Center https://hotelrondinella.com/the-magic-of-marygroves-early-ed-center/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 00:30:02 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/the-magic-of-marygroves-early-ed-center/ In its second school year, Marygrove Early Education Center strives to provide a holistic educational experience for students, teachers and families. Its state-of-the-art facility, designed in collaboration with parents, providers and members of the surrounding community, has recently received international recognition. This fall, the Kresge Foundation won a distinguished architecture award for commissioning the design […]]]>

In its second school year, Marygrove Early Education Center strives to provide a holistic educational experience for students, teachers and families. Its state-of-the-art facility, designed in collaboration with parents, providers and members of the surrounding community, has recently received international recognition.

This fall, the Kresge Foundation won a distinguished architecture award for commissioning the design of the center, which opened last august as part of a large-scale partnership to transform the former footprint of Marygrove College into an innovative cradle-to-career educational campus.

Detroit program general manager Wendy Lewis Jackson accepted the award for Kresge in Vicenza, Italy, with architect Marlon Blackwell. She applauded the work of the Blackwell team for engaging with the community to create “a transformational space that demonstrates dignity for young children”.

Kresge Detroit Program General Manager Wendy Lewis Jackson and architect Marlon Blackwell receive Dedalo Minosse Award citations. On the left is Dr. Valentina Galan, director of cultural heritage and activities of the Veneto region. Courtesy of Kresge.“It’s a beautiful and integral part of a neighborhood that’s working to revitalize itself,” she said. “It really underscores the value of well-designed public projects like the Marygrove Early Education Center and the positive educational impact it provides to its communities – with dignity, wonder and joy!”

Kresge was one of four non-Italian winners to win a Dedalo Minosse award and the only American winner. The awards, presented since 1997, celebrate the unique bond between client and architect necessary to create inspiring architecture. This inspiration can be seen in the center’s vibrant terracotta cladding, sunlit classrooms, hallways, and the surprising balance the modern 22,000 square foot center strikes with its Tudor Gothic surroundings.

Starfish Family Services operates the center, implementing and testing new best practices that providers and communities can replicate regionally and nationally. The space is amazing, says Jody Waits, Starfish’s director of development, but the real magic is the thoughtful integration of nurturing and wellness that happens inside.
Jody Waits, Head of Development at Starfish, with Peggy Kaczmarek, Senior Donor Relations Specialist, in the staff atrium.
“We hope what we learn here will become something we can replicate through Starfish and the global movement and professionalization of early childhood education, which is often labeled as babysitting,” she says. “If there’s anything we’ve learned from COVID-19, education and mental well-being at this point is virtually impossible to detach.”

The Model D team spent the afternoon with Waits and Starfish staff and teachers, visiting classrooms, playgrounds, behavioral health rooms and community spaces to learn magic behind this innovative model.

Starfish Family Services celebrates nearly 60 years. The nonprofit social service agency focuses on education through Head Start and the Great Start to Readiness program and behavioral health services for infants up to age 20.
The University of Michigan and Starfish developed the center’s curriculum focused on literacy, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), social justice, and racial empowerment.
Using the U of M program, “you could have a three-year-old who really has their day designed to read ‘The Hungry Caterpillar,’ but also start to identify inequities and how to use your voice,” says Waits. .
Each classroom is connected to an outdoor courtyard or play area with a glass wall to help bring the outdoors in.
Students log outdoors daily and explore the green space in all seasons.The Early Head Start class pose together during recess.Early childhood teachers Nicole Clark and Tammie Dailey stand in the toddler playground. Clark says she loves how every classroom is flooded with light and teachers and students can enjoy the outdoors throughout the day.
From its headquarters in Inkster, Starfish prepares and delivers healthy meals to students daily.
Classrooms are designed with a core module to provide teachers with increased support and collaboration. They shared student toilets, diapers and handwashing stations.
The family wellness center is in the ramp-up phase. Currently, occupational therapists travel to the site to work with the students. Plans include physiotherapy and speech therapy, but labor shortages have made recruitment difficult.
University of Michigan assistant clinical professor “Nurse Laura” Gultekin, Ph.D., is the center’s nurse navigator. She helps families with children with complex needs connect and receive support services.
Therapeutic spaces give a child displaying “big behaviors” an opportunity to calm down. Through an observation window, parents and behavioral health professionals can see the child in its natural form.
Using play therapy, a behavioral health specialist can see how a child interacts with toys to help them discern what their home life might be like.
The center hosts indoor playrooms for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Gross motor activities include standing, jumping, running, throwing and catching a ball.
The Staff Wellness Lounge offers healthy snacks, coffee, yoga on TV, and space to eat, relax, or complete a project. The adjacent atrium encourages teachers to rest in the sun and in nature.Staff atrium.
Director Celina Byrd says the centre’s intentionally designed spaces, like the reading corner, ensure that children, parents, staff and the community all have a place.The parent’s lounge at the center front was designed explicitly around parent feedback. Offering Wi-Fi, laptops, tables, coffee and snacks, it’s a meeting place and a space to get some work done or decompress before pick-up.“Le bosquet” is the largest playground in the center, located in the surrounding neighborhood, where children from 3 to 4 years old play. Each of the oldest classrooms has direct access to the natural park.
“There’s a whole world here,” Waits says. The children have named the trees and know where the fairies live.
Students bring home vegetables they grow in their gardens to help promote healthy eating.
The mosaic created by the center’s community depicts the role of early childhood education in a child’s life: planting, nurturing and helping beauty to flourish

All photos, unless otherwise stated, were taken by Steve Koss.

This entry is part of our Early education matters series, exploring the state of early childhood education and care in our region. Thanks to the generous support of the Southeast Michigan Early Childhood Funder Collaboration (SEMI ECFC) we will report on what parents and providers are currently experiencing, what is working and what is not, and who is discovering solutions.

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Wellness center update shows some changes https://hotelrondinella.com/wellness-center-update-shows-some-changes/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 00:11:00 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/wellness-center-update-shows-some-changes/ by Gordon Wolf The second meeting to brief the public on preliminary designs for a proposed Crawford County wellness center was held Wednesday night at the Boulders Conference Center, and the part of the design that generated the most questions was the center for the elderly / multipurpose room. According to the slides shown, this […]]]>

by Gordon Wolf

The second meeting to brief the public on preliminary designs for a proposed Crawford County wellness center was held Wednesday night at the Boulders Conference Center, and the part of the design that generated the most questions was the center for the elderly / multipurpose room.

According to the slides shown, this room would be on the first floor (or main level) of the wellness center and would have its own entrance from the parking lot on the west side of the facility.

The first public design update was on September 21 when the preliminary designs being developed by HGM Associates Inc. were 60% complete.

For Wednesday’s meeting, the preliminary designs were 80% complete.

A number of people who attend Crawford County Senior Center, located on South Main, wanted to know why a senior center was included in the plans. Among those who asked this question was Ron Songer, director of the senior center.

People also read…

A few comments from these customers were to “leave us where we are”.

As more questions were being asked by seniors, Wellness Center Committee Member Steve Brownmiller suggested that city staff meet with people from the seniors’ center.

During part of the discussion, City Manager Brad Hanson spoke with Songer, who was seated at the back of the room. Later, Hanson said he and maybe a council member would meet with the people who frequent the senior center.

At the start of the meeting, Hanson explained that the initial preliminary design included many amenities, but some were removed based on projected costs. He said what needed to be done first was to present the “Taj Mahal” version, so that later when people asked why a certain convenience was not included, the answer would be that it had been considered but the budget is limited.

He said the wellness center committee, made up of citizens, believes that funds can be raised for a wellness center.

The Wellness Center and Country Home is planned for the property across from Denison High School and immediately north of the Aquatic Center.

Renderings and preliminary drawings will show more progress as the design process progresses.

The wellness center with all major sports facilities will be to the south of the sports complex. The field has often been referred to as an indoor soccer field, but it can be used for a number of other activities.

For the purposes of soccer or other activities, the whole field could be used, or it could be divided for two activities taking place at the same time.

The country house is accessible from the wellness center but will also have a separate entrance with its own parking lot.

Jared Olson of HGM described the layout of the Wellness Center from the perspective of the front (west side) entrance from 16th Street North. To the left are the toilets and an open changing room. Also to the left is a cloakroom and some staff offices. To the right are a larger toilet and steps to the second level.

The senior center / multipurpose room would also be to the right of the main entrance, on the ground floor, further past the large washrooms. It will have a kitchen. Partitions will allow for different sized areas in the room.

The room would have a kitchen. Plans are for a walk-in freezer and walk-in coolers.

The floor would be hard surfaced instead of carpeted so that it could be cleaned more easily.

A hard surface multipurpose court would also be on the main level. The slide that was shown Wednesday night was set up for basketball, but the court can be edged for volleyball, pickle ball and other activities that can be played on a hard-surface court.

Movable and collapsible bleachers would be located at the sides of the pitch for spectators.

The second level of the wellness center would house aerobics equipment, strength-training equipment, an aerobics classroom, and a walking track that would follow the perimeter of the hard-surfaced court below.

On the southeast side of the second level would be an access entrance during times when the lower level of the wellness center would be closed. The facility will be built on the hill, so parking on the southeast side would be at the same level as the after-hours entrance.

The size of the walking track is currently proposed to be three lanes wide; the final configuration would be decided during the development of the construction drawings. Olson said the committee wanted to have space outside the track for people to stand while others use it.

The second floor is also where a children’s play area would be.

Olson pointed out that what was being presented were preliminary plans, not final plans. Input from Wednesday’s meeting and direction from the Wellness Center Committee will be required before the preliminary plans are 100% complete.

A master plan for the development of the whole area in the future was also presented. Read more about that in Tuesday’s Denison Bulletin.

Olson noted during the question and answer period that construction of the wellness center and field house is two or three years away from completion, if the project goes ahead, “the way whose construction is taking place,” he added.

Here are the questions asked and the answers. In some cases, questions could not be answered because the design did not reach a point where certain questions were answered. Hanson and Olson answered questions.

Read more questions and answers online at www.dbrnews.com and in Tuesday’s Denison Bulletin.

Q: What is the initial cost estimate?

A. At the moment, we don’t share the cost value because we still restrict the design.

Q: Will this be funded by city taxpayers?

A: The intent of the Wellness Committee is to seek funds (donations) and grants to pay for all costs. Right now that is our goal, so we have no intention of raising taxes.

Q: The golf course (possibly meaning Boulders Conference Center) was not supposed to use taxpayers’ money and now it is using taxpayers’ money.

A: The structure (Boulders) requires part of the general fund to be supported. With this year’s change, we hope that will change and sail the other way. (Chris Polley’s company leased the Boulders Conference Center minus the golf course pavilion space).

Q: How will you pay operating funds? Right now you can’t even fix the streets?

A: That’s a question I didn’t answer when I arrived (Hanson, who became city manager earlier this year). Staff are currently working on how we will find operating costs.

Q: How much will it cost someone to use the facility and where will that money go?

A: The Welfare Committee conducted a study which estimated that we would need 700 members at an annual cost of approximately $380 per family.

Q: Will we have to pay to use the senior center?

A: At this time, the intention is that if the senior center moves to the wellness center, seniors can enter and use the senior center and there is talk that once there , you can use the walking track and the fitness center at no extra cost, but it’s just under discussion at the moment.

Q: Meals are now served at the senior center. Will this continue?

A: Yes. I understand that’s what we’re working towards. We had a chat with your cook and asked her what kind of appliances she wanted – commercial or standard kitchen. She answered commercial and I think that’s what we learned during one of our appointments.

Ron Songer, the senior center manager, asked why the senior center was placed in the wellness center design in the first place.

Hanson replied, “From what I understand, the current facility is in very poor condition. We’re going to have to spend a lot of money on this facility and that’s why we potentially considered this move. In moving to this facility, if the council decides to do so, this room may be eligible for additional funding, a Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Community Development Block Grant. Whereas if we try to renovate the current facility, it would probably cost more than this facility (just the multi-purpose room).

Think: You’re telling me you’re going to spend $1 million there (wellness center room), couldn’t you give $100,000 to upgrade the building?

Hanson: So when you walk through the building and look at the building, you have equipment that doesn’t work properly, the brick is falling off the building, the kitchen is also very compact. These are the comments. Again, if the council decides that’s where they want to move (the senior center). If they decide they don’t know what to do, it will be a multipurpose room. And these are just the main elements that we could see (along with the current senior center).

Q: How far is the parking lot from the senior center? Right now it’s not a far walk. Will parking for the senior center be reserved?

A. The front parking lot was shown on a slide.

Q. Will parking be reserved (for seniors)?

A. Using this front parking lot gives access right there (pointing to the parking lot on the slide). He does not say that he will be reserved. I don’t think we have that decision.

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Health Alliance Plan and MSU Health Care Introduce $0 HMO Medicare Advantage Plan https://hotelrondinella.com/health-alliance-plan-and-msu-health-care-introduce-0-hmo-medicare-advantage-plan/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 13:15:00 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/health-alliance-plan-and-msu-health-care-introduce-0-hmo-medicare-advantage-plan/ Versatile HMO is available in 46 counties with access to 50,000 providers DETROIT and LANSING EAST, November 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Health Alliance Plan (HAP) and MSU Health Care have strengthened their commitment to providing access to affordable healthcare in Michigan by introducing a new Medicare option. The HAP MSUHC Medicare HMO is the most […]]]>

Versatile HMO is available in 46 counties with access to 50,000 providers

DETROIT and LANSING EAST, November 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Health Alliance Plan (HAP) and MSU Health Care have strengthened their commitment to providing access to affordable healthcare in Michigan by introducing a new Medicare option. The HAP MSUHC Medicare HMO is the most versatile HMO plan offered by HAP and is designed to help seniors in Michigan manage their health and age on the spot, while providing healthcare coverage for their unique needs.

Equipped with a $0 prime and $0 primary care provider (PCP) co-payment, the HAP MSUHC Medicare HMO is available to all Medicare-eligible individuals in 46 Michigan counties. Members of this plan have access to HAP’s comprehensive HMO provider network which includes more than 50,000 healthcare providers across the state.

“HAP and MSU Health Care share a common mission to improve the health and well-being of the communities we serve,” said Michel Genord MD., Chairman and CEO of HAP. “The first fruits of this long-term partnership, which combines MSU Health Care’s clinical expertise with HAP’s leadership in health insurance, is this new plan that gives seniors more options than ever to manage their health. By having access to HAP’s comprehensive HMO network, our members can get the care they need, when and where they need it.”

Unique to this plane is a $500 flex card which includes funds for two categories of benefits that can be used at the member’s discretion:

  • $200 can be used for dental, vision and hearing services (or any combination of the three)
  • $300 can be used for companion care, personal emergency response system (PERS), transportation, and over-the-counter items (retail or mail order)

Other features of the HAP MSUHC Medicare HMO plan include:

  • $0 co-pay on mental health visits
  • $30 copayment on specialist visits, which is among the lowest specialty copayments in the state*
  • Dental service with a $3,000 maximum coverage allowance – the highest in the state* – which includes coverage for extractions.
  • A visitor-traveler benefit that extends coverage to members traveling to Arizona, Florida, Texas or other parts of Michigan up to 12 months.
  • No annual limit on worldwide emergency coverage
  • Access to a personal service coordinator who provides concierge-level service

“The HAP/MSU Health Care partnership combines exceptional healthcare with affordable coverage options to support better health outcomes,” said Seth Ciabotti, CEO of MSU Health Care. “Transforming the delivery of health care for our communities to reduce costs, improve health and improve access for all is a visionary mission that will require the use of new methods and new partners to deliver world-class care.This new HMO is just the first of what we hope will be many opportunities for MSU Health Care and HAP to deliver quality, innovative co-branded products that serve the people of this great State.”

The annual Medicare enrollment period runs from From October 15 to December 7, 2022with effective coverage January 1st2023. For more information about HAP MSUHC Medicare HMO or to compare plans, visit www.hap.org/medicare or call HAP at 800-868-9885 (TTY: 711) Monday through Friday, 8am8 p.m.

A partnership rooted in shared values

The HAP-MSU Health Care partnership is one of the first results of the historic 30-year partnership between Henry Ford Health and MSU, which was announced in February 2021. The Henry Ford/MSU agreement is designed to facilitate and support breakthrough research; provide the best cancer care; increase training and diversity among the next generation of health professionals; and addressing health care disparities in traditionally underserved communities.

The HAP MSUHC Medicare HMO is the first joint product offered by HAP and MSU Health Care after their 2021 announcement that they were joining forces to improve the health of seniors statewide. Since then, the two organizations have undertaken several key initiatives focused on educating MSU alumni and other seniors about the important role Medicare Advantage can play in managing their health. These initiatives have included free educational seminars/webinars, as well as free Medicare planning checklists for patients of MSU-affiliated providers.

In addition, HAP has signed a three-year sponsorship agreement with the University of Michigan Athletics Department. Sponsorship of men’s and women’s soccer, hockey, and basketball strengthens the partnership between HAP and MSU.

About the Health Alliance plan

Health Alliance Plan (HAP) is a Michigannot-for-profit health plan that provides health coverage to individuals and businesses of all sizes. For 60 years, HAP has partnered with leading physicians and hospitals, employers and community organizations to improve the health and well-being of the lives it touches. HAP offers a product portfolio with six distinct product lines: Commercial Insured Group, Individual, Medicare, Medicaid (using the name HAP Empowered), Self-Funded, and Network Rental. HAP excels in delivering award-winning prevention services, disease management and wellness programs, and personalized customer service. For more information, visit www.hap.org.

About MSU Health Care

MSU Health Care is the fully integrated academic health center of University of Michigan, representing more than 600 faculty and affiliated providers. Our commitment to safe, high-quality patient care is realized through our comprehensive services for people of all ages, training the next generation of healthcare providers, and medical research. MSU health care providers treat continuing primary care as well as some of the rarest forms of cancer and neurological diseases, as well as advanced surgical, pharmaceutical, rehabilitation, therapy and imaging services. With over 100 affiliates located near and as far away as Ludington, Saginaw, Detroitand Marquette, MSU Health Care empowers Michigan’s hope and healing. Our clinical efforts support future advancements through academic and research initiatives at University of Michigan. https://healthcare.msu.edu/

*Based on a comparison of Medicare Advantage plans offered in all 46 counties Michigan service area.

SOURCE Health Alliance Plan

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Deion Sanders answers a question about offers from top schools https://hotelrondinella.com/deion-sanders-answers-a-question-about-offers-from-top-schools/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 01:52:11 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/deion-sanders-answers-a-question-about-offers-from-top-schools/ Jackson State University head football coach Deion Sanders speaks to the media during a press conference at JSU’s Walter Payton Recreation and Wellness Center in Jackson, Mississippi, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020 Photo credit: Eric Shelton/Clarion Ledger via Imagn Content Services, SARL As long as Deion Sanders continues to win at Jackson State, he will continue […]]]>

Jackson State University head football coach Deion Sanders speaks to the media during a press conference at JSU’s Walter Payton Recreation and Wellness Center in Jackson, Mississippi, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020 Photo credit: Eric Shelton/Clarion Ledger via Imagn Content Services, SARL

As long as Deion Sanders continues to win at Jackson State, he will continue to be tied to Power 5 jobs. Even Sanders isn’t hiding that fact.

Sanders appeared on ESPN’s “College GameDay” on Saturday and was asked about potential interest from FBS schools. The Jackson State head coach made it clear he has no plans to quit his current job, but was also candid about his willingness to at least listen to other opportunities.

“I would be a fool and a liar to tell you that I am not going to maintain these things, because I am. But I have no plans to move or go anywhere,” Sanders said.

Kudos to Sanders for being honest about this. Speculation will hover around him, whether he recognizes it or not. He may as well be upfront about it, while making it clear that he hardly sends active feelers for other jobs. He has been consistent about this answer as well, which only makes it more authentic.

Reports have suggested that some top schools have already considered suing Sanders. However, it doesn’t look like anyone came close to pulling him away from Jackson State.

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NJCU Partners with JC Medical Center for Student Health Services – The Gothic Times https://hotelrondinella.com/njcu-partners-with-jc-medical-center-for-student-health-services-the-gothic-times/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 12:02:13 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/njcu-partners-with-jc-medical-center-for-student-health-services-the-gothic-times/ NJCU will begin a partnership with Jersey City Medical Center (JCMC) this semester to provide additional health services to students. At the September 1 emergency board meeting when the plan was approved, Jodi Bailey, vice president of student affairs, explained that it will not replace existing services at the health and wellness center. -be. “Our […]]]>

NJCU will begin a partnership with Jersey City Medical Center (JCMC) this semester to provide additional health services to students.

At the September 1 emergency board meeting when the plan was approved, Jodi Bailey, vice president of student affairs, explained that it will not replace existing services at the health and wellness center. -be.

“Our student population needs expanded services,” Bailey said at the trustees’ meeting.

Bailey also said the partnership with JCMC will serve to provide students with better access to health services through extended hours and a more streamlined system. NJCU staff will be trained in JCMC systems and the school will also provide shuttle services to the Greenville site as needed, she said.

At the September 1 meeting, it was mentioned that the Student Government Association (SGA) would provide funding and be linked to the partnership.

“This is something that we are currently discussing with the SGA. When the SGA feels comfortable discussing it, it is their prerogative to release this information,” Bailey said in a statement regarding the SGA’s funding. “It’s not something the university expects, it’s something we seek sponsorship for, the same way any other organization would seek funding.”

SGA said in a statement, “SGA is pleased to announce that we have partnered with Jersey City Medical Center to allow students to seek the medical assistance they need without any insurance concerns. Our role is to ensure that NJCU students always come first and receive the supreme care they deserve.

The student government will contribute $20,000 to help offset costs for students without insurance. Photo by Haresh Oudhnarine.

Thyquel Halley, president of SGA, said at their Sept. 26 meeting that they would donate $20,000 to help offset the costs of students without insurance.

Ira Thor, Senior Director of Communications, explained that the JCMC partnership would cost the school nothing since “the services are covered by health insurance – the same as an urgent care facility or a doctor” .

Many students have noticed this semester that they are no longer billed for health insurance on their tuition bills. Thor said NJCU decided to end the health insurance requirement last year and that decision was unrelated to the JCMC partnership.

He said: “Health insurance was subsidized between the University and the SGA of approximately $2.2 million as students could not afford the price. We had to make financial decisions about renewal, and the former CFO and former president determined that insurance was no longer something the university could purchase.

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Rays of Hope returns with 10,000 people marching, topping $320,000 raised for breast cancer research https://hotelrondinella.com/rays-of-hope-returns-with-10000-people-marching-topping-320000-raised-for-breast-cancer-research/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 21:46:00 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/rays-of-hope-returns-with-10000-people-marching-topping-320000-raised-for-breast-cancer-research/ SPRINGFIELD – Rays of Hope returned in person this year as excited as ever and with long term plans to prepare for any future disasters. Over the past 29 years, the event has grown in popularity and raised $16 million, but the last walk and run to raise money for breast cancer research was in […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD – Rays of Hope returned in person this year as excited as ever and with long term plans to prepare for any future disasters.

Over the past 29 years, the event has grown in popularity and raised $16 million, but the last walk and run to raise money for breast cancer research was in 2019. The pandemic of COVID-19 has forced the event to go virtual in 2020 and this has been replaced by a parade of cars in 2021.

On Sunday, he returned with around 10,000 people participating. Survivors and their supporters created a sea of ​​pink as they gathered for a pre-event celebration in the Temple Beth El parking lot. This was followed by a pink wave as walkers and runners wearing hats , scarves, jackets and pink sweaters headed for a 2 or 5 mile course in and around Forest Park.

“They’ve been doing hybrid events (during the pandemic) and it was fun with the cars all decorated, but having that crowd back is so much better,” said Dr. Mark Keroack, President and CEO. from Baystate Health.

All money raised stays in Western Massachusetts and goes towards cancer research, treatment and education. One of the main projects funded by Rays of hope studies breast cancer markers and uses data to try to determine why some get cancer and others don’t, he said.

In-person events also raised more money than virtual events. Last year, $320,000 was donated to Rays of Hope, and this year organizers said they beat that tally before the walk even started. It will take several days before the final totals are tabulated.

Lucy Giuggio Carvalho, a breast cancer survivor, founded the event while she was still undergoing treatment. Nearly three decades later, she said her goal was to find a cure so he was no longer needed.

“It may not be sunny, but it’s sunny in our hearts,” she said, referring to the overcast skies. “There’s nothing like being face to face.”

Although the event and fundraiser survived the COVID-19 pandemic, Giuggio Carvalho said it made him realize that Rays of Hope needed a long-term strategy to ensure that the money is available for research and education until it is no longer needed.

During the event, she and Kathy Tobin, director of annual giving and events for the Baystate Health Foundation, announced plans to create an endowment fund in addition to the walk. Such a fund will help ensure that doctors and researchers will have funding even if another disaster prevents walking and running from taking place.

“I think we’ve bounced back,” said Lindsey Bubar of East Longmeadow, this year’s chair for the Rays of Hope event.

Looking out at the sea of ​​people, Bubar singled out the family and friends who formed “Lindsey’s Tribe” many years ago and thanked everyone who came out for someone else: “Behind every survivor is a system really great support.”

“I’ve been a five-year cancer survivor, and I fully intend to be a 10-year survivor and a 20-year survivor,” she said. “I plan to live my life to the fullest.”

But she also recalled that the many people who died from the disease asked for a minute of silence.

Dr. Grace Makari-Judson, associate medical director of the Baystate Regional Cancer Program and co-director of the Rays of Hope Center for Breast Cancer Research, explained how fundraising enabled the research center to create a breast cancer registry board of directors. breast cancer to give doctors insight into the impact of the disease on the residents of the Pioneer Valley.

Currently, one in eight people in the region suffers from breast cancer. Makari-Judson said researchers have been trying to figure out what protects the unafflicted seven.

“In breast surgery, many things have changed and for the better. And our technology has improved and our techniques have improved and we are learning how to treat patients better by, in many cases, doing less,” she said. “When we needed help, when we needed funding for some of this technology, Rays of Hope has always been there for us,” she said.

L to R- Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno, Jackie and Al Rodriguez, and Kathy Tobin of the Baystate Health Foundation at the 29th Annual Rays of Hope to Cure Breast Cancer Walk and Run taking place at the Temple Beth parking lot El on Dickinson St in Springfield on October 23 in Springfield. (Photo by Ed Cohen)

Mayor Domenic J. Sarno and City Council Speaker Jesse Lederman also attended the event and said they were proud that it ran through the city’s Forest Park.

Sarno said he’s been walking for 27 years and still enjoys the camaraderie it brings, so he’s happy to bring it back in person. He always wears shorts to show off his hot pink socks printed with dark pink ribbons, which he has “reused” from when his daughter was a footballer.

Looking around at the thousands gathered, Sarno marveled that it all started at Giuggio Carvalho’s kitchen table. Last year, City Hall employees along with their friends and family raised $10,000 for Rays of Hope. So far they’ve raised $6,000 this year, but haven’t finished yet.

Attendees ranged from people who attend walkers every year for the first time such as Marissa Szczepanek, owner of Bridal Corner of Chicopee, who was joined by a team of half a dozen supporters dressed in pink tutus and veils roses.

“It’s overwhelming and surreal, but just taking this photo of all the survivors, it seemed like everyone was supporting us,” she said, referring to a group photo taken of all the survivors. before the start of the walk.

Szczepanek was diagnosed with stage 1 breast cancer in September 2021 and after treatment she is now cancer free.

Major sponsors of this year’s Rays of Hope include Baystate Breast & Wellness Center, Baystate Breast Specialists, Chicopee Savings Charitable Foundation, Gilead, Golden Years Home Care Services, Kinsley Power Systems, Radiology & Imaging, Inc., USA Waste and Recycling and Zasco Productions. . Several other companies and teams also served as sponsors.

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Micron Tech. files plan for Boise plant expansion https://hotelrondinella.com/micron-tech-files-plan-for-boise-plant-expansion/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 21:36:00 +0000 https://hotelrondinella.com/micron-tech-files-plan-for-boise-plant-expansion/ Micron Technology has filed the first round of permits for the planned large-scale expansion of its Boise headquarters. The plan includes a dizzying array of new buildings and features to support its plan to bring semiconductor manufacturing back to the United States. In total, the plan would add more than 6.5 million square feet of […]]]>

Micron Technology has filed the first round of permits for the planned large-scale expansion of its Boise headquarters. The plan includes a dizzying array of new buildings and features to support its plan to bring semiconductor manufacturing back to the United States.

In total, the plan would add more than 6.5 million square feet of space to the site – about the size of the Pentagon.

To achieve this, Micron will need several permits. For starters, he will need to annex additional land he owns within the city limits of Boise. The land sits on what the city calls the Columbia Bench — the area south of Idaho 21 and roughly north of Interstate 84 in southeast Boise. Micron also hopes the city will give him approval to rezone a strip of land.

What is planned

Site plan for the proposed expansion of the Micron campus. By Micron

The fabulous

A conditional use permit application for campus expansion details a significant number of new buildings or an expansion of existing buildings.

The biggest, by far, is the planned new “fab” – short for manufacturing plant. The building will rise four stories and comprise 4.85 million square feet of space. At 160 feet tall, it would be about as tall as the downtown Idaho Power building.

Although there is no reliable record-keeping source, it would likely be the largest building in the state of Idaho. Amazon’s fulfillment center in Nampa, for example, is about half the size at 2.65 million square feet. The Amazon Nampa building occupies approximately 650,000 square feet on the ground floor, while the Micron factory is 1.2 million on the first floor alone.

“The size, scale and complexity of the plant requires many new employees and supporting facilities to operate,” Micron facilities architect Paul Marcolina wrote in an application letter. “To support the fab, we will add office, manufacturing, administrative and utility facilities.”

The building will include 600,000 square feet of cleanroom space – a controlled area for low airborne particulate matter used in semiconductor development and production.

At a groundbreaking ceremony last month, Micron said the Boise cleanroom would be the largest in the United States. However, he said later it would build 2.4 million square feet of cleanroom space in a separate New York expansion.

Support buildings

Administrative building

While the fab is the star of the show, the rest of the expansion adds significant new facilities to the already sprawling Boise campus.

A new administration building would parallel Federal Way and be located near the plant. The plan calls for a large podium-style car park on the lower levels, which can accommodate 3,600 cars. By comparison, the Capital City Development Corp. operates six public parking lots in downtown Boise, which together include only 3,179 parking spaces.

Beyond the large parking lot, the building will have office space, as well as a wellness center and a fitness center. It will include 440,000 square feet of space.

This building is separate from a project that BoiseDev told you about in August build a new “world-class” office building elsewhere on campus.

Construction of the probe

Parallel to the administration building and connected by a courtyard is a structure that Micron calls the Probe building. It will be 365,000 square feet in size and will also connect to the FB, as well as another nearby building via an air bridge.

“The upper floor of the probe building is primarily a clean room space (approximately 85,000 square feet) where the final stage of the wafer fabrication process, functionality testing, is completed,” Marcolina wrote.

On the lower floors of the probe building, Micron is planning additional offices, a cafeteria and other uses.

Building B51X

An existing manufacturing building, which Micron calls B51, will add 92,000 square feet of space.

“We will expand our existing TD wafer fabrication facility to include an automated material handling system that will automatically transfer wafers produced onsite to the probe facility for testing and ultimately to the FAB for microchip fabrication,” wrote Marcolina.

This extension of the building will connect to the Probe facility and ultimately to the new factory itself.

Central utility building

Just north of the plant, Micron will construct a new central utility building. Covering 450,000 square feet, it will include support systems that the company says will help run the plant and “power manufacturing and manufacturing processes such as boilers and chillers.”

Mask making building

An existing mask manufacturing plant – or “crosshairswill also see expansion with another 30,000 square feet.

But wait, there’s more…

The project also includes several production support buildings, a construction warehouse, a building for suppliers, etc. It also includes several elements for the support of public services.

Gaz factory

A new tall gas plant will be built and the City of Boise will have to sign a height exemption for a new tall structure.

“Semiconductor manufacturing requires high purity gases,” Marcolina wrote. “The gas plant will use two gas columns and cold chambers to separate gases like oxygen and nitrogen from ambient air for use in the FAB. For the gas plant to operate, the columns must have a height of about 185 feet.

The columns will be about as high as the Wells Fargo Building in downtown Boise.

The Gasworks is on the far eastern side of the campus expansion

water treatment plant

Micron says it will operate its own water treatment plant on site.

“This state-of-the-art water treatment facility will have multiple functions,” Marcolina wrote. “T will treat incoming water to ensure it meets our high purity specifications for manufacturing in the FAB, and it will serve as a wastewater treatment facility.”

Marcolina’s letter said they would use water from both the municipal water system operated by Veolia, as well as “on-site groundwater sources.”

“Water conservation and reuse is paramount and Micron plans to treat and reuse the majority of our wastewater onsite,” he wrote. “Any excess sewage will be fully treated before being discharged to the city’s treatment facility.”

electric yard

A 22-acre portion of the campus will be converted to serve as an electrical yard. Micron says the facility will act as a substation and help meet the plant’s power needs. The company said the equipment will be operated by Idaho Power.

And after

Micron’s expansion will require conditional use license approval, as well as annexation and rezoning. Hearing dates for the endorsements have yet to be set.

Micron said the project would be built by 2030.

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