Philanthropic Pole books TWO hotels for Ukrainian refugees – The First News

The Texas-based Polish entrepreneur announced the initiative on the “Pomoc dla Ukrainy” (Help for Ukraine) Facebook group, saying that together with his team they had paid for more than 120 places “with full meals and service”. in the hotels of the picturesque tourist town. Kazimierz Dolny.
Hotel Spichlerz/Villa Prezydent

A Texas-based Pole has booked all the rooms in two hotels in a Polish town to help welcome Ukrainian mothers and their children fleeing war-torn Ukraine.

The philanthropist who wishes to remain anonymous announced the initiative on the Facebook group “Pomoc dla Ukrainy” (Help for Ukraine) saying that together with his team they had paid for more than 120 places “with full meals and service”.

The first refugees arrived at Hotel Spichlerz on February 27, three days after Putin invaded Ukraine.Hotel Spichlerz

The two hotels, Spichlerz and Villa Prezydent in the picturesque tourist town of Kazimierz Dolny, are now full of staff, volunteers and coordinators working to support families while they find their feet in Poland.

Speaking to local newspaper Dziennik Wschodni, Bartek Sobczyk, one of the initiative’s field coordinators, said: “Two administrators from the Facebook group called me to confirm if the message was not fake. No it is true. The president of our company does not count the money, he is a man with a big heart.

Coordinating activities on the ground 10,000 kilometers away and hosting refugees from the early days of the war, the contractor said he had also not ruled out the possibility of booking more hotels.Hotel Spichlerz

Also speaking to the newspaper, the philanthropist said his identity was “inconsequential”, adding: Everyone is doing what they can, it’s just one way we could help.

Coordinating activities on the ground 10,000 kilometers away and hosting refugees from the early days of the war, the contractor said he had also not ruled out the possibility of booking more hotels.

Hotel Spichlerz

The two hotels, Spichlerz and Villa Prezydent in the picturesque tourist town of Kazimierz Dolny, are now full of staff, volunteers and coordinators working to support families while they find their feet in Poland.Villa Prezydent

He said: “We approach it methodically, not spontaneously. First, we want to provide security and accommodation, later it will be time for help and psychological support and maybe help in finding work. In the long term, these people need the possibility of a normal life.

“Hotels have agreed to forgo profits, so we’re just paying them what we need so they don’t have to worry about costs, so they can shop, so they can keep the heating on and treat these people like normal hotel guests.

Grateful Ukrainian children drew thank you messages for hotel staff.Hotel Spichlerz

Since learning of the arrival of their Ukrainian refugees, local people have also been keen to help and come to the hotel reception to help collect food and necessary hygiene and cosmetic items.

A local ceramic artist, Olga Suvorova, who lives in the town and is originally from Ukraine, also volunteered her time to help overcome the language barrier.

The Texas-based Polish philanthropist told local media: “The hotels have agreed to waive profits, so we’re just paying them what we need so they don’t have to worry about the costs, so they can do their shopping, then they can keep the heating on and treat these people like normal hotel guests. Hotel Spichlerz

Paweł and Łukasz, who have rented Spichlerz for a year, posted on the hotel’s Facebook to thank local businesses and individuals who have helped, saying, “Thank you so much for the help given by businesses, individual benefactors , everybody.

“Thanks to you, we can bear the burden of the stay of Ukrainian refugees in our hotel. Thank you for your financial, spiritual and psychological support for Ukraine and for us.

Refugees at the two hotels sometimes stay just a night or a few nights, before moving on to more permanent accommodation and new people arrive to take their place, with coordinators and volunteers working around the clock to help provide care and support for newcomers, including help with practicalities such as medical prescriptions.

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